Category Archives: Breastfeeding

Linengate2014 and How You Can Help #normalizebreastfeeding

Ever since Phoenixgate 2013, I’ve been pretty lax about nursing in public (and by pretty lax I really mean “I really don’t give a shit if you see my boobs”). For the most part, people have been great about it outwardly – even if in their head they are uncomfortable or freaking out. I generally like to go out in public and bring my baby, so I knew some sort of nursing-in-public run-in was bound to happen. Unfortunately, it happened at one of our favorite restaurants (that ironically hosted my baby shower)… let’s go back a few months to brunch for my father’s birthday.

Help me understand what you mean by “a clean linen?”

I was breastfeeding my daughter after we ate when our server approached and asked if I wanted a “clean linen.” Why the hell would I need a “clean linen” when we were done eating and what exactly did that mean? Was it a napkin? A tablecloth? Then the lightbulb went off – he was offering me the best nursing cover he could muster up from the restaurant’s linen closet. Aside from the fact that I probably wouldn’t be so nonchalant about nursing in the first place if I had indeed been in need of a cover, I politely declined.

Dude should have stopped while he was ahead. And, for the record, he was ahead – I had given him the benefit of the doubt and assumed he was actually trying to make me more comfortable based on what he thought would be most helpful to me. HA! But really…  I did want to think he was being helpful. My new friend brought me back down to reality, where lactating boobs are a no-no but a string bikini is sexy: “No, I meant in case it bothers other people.”

OHYOUVEGOTTOBEF&*KINGKIDDINGME.

photo 2 (1)

#normalizebreastfeeding | photograph by Katie Slater  www.katieslaterphotography.com

Did this guy think that I was suddenly going to change my mind and take him up on his offer? NO. The opposite.”Other people?” PUH-leaze. Enough is enough. Just the offer of the cover implied so many things – that breastfeeding should be hidden; that it’s dirty, offensive or wrong; that a hungry infant is LESS important than self-sufficient adults who just gorged themselves on all you can eat brunch and have the choice whether they watch a mother breastfeed or not; and so on – but to imply that I should prioritize the comfort of “other” people over the comfort of my baby? EHHH… WRONG ANSWER. Again, I politely declined and shut the conversation down. So as not to cause a scene, I planned to find him before we left and inform him of things like, oh, you know, THE LAW that protects women like me.

Clean Linens for All!

During that meal, bothering other people with a boob was the last thing on my mind – in fact, I was much more concerned about bothering people when my kid lost her shit because she was hungry – I would think most people would find a screaming baby more annoying than a boob. Nursing was a pretty solid solution to prevent said meltdown and make everyone’s brunch enjoyable. And for the record, since apparently it cannot be said often enough: a nursing mother is not out to make a scene or bother anyone or make anyone uncomfortable. Say it with me now: she just wants to feed or comfort her baby. 

This whole thing got me thinking that maybe I should start going off on people in public who do things that bother ME! Why should I be the target of other people’s pet peeves about nursing while everyone else gets off scot-free for being total assholes in public ALL the time? So, in honor of Linengate2014, I’ll be handing out some linens to the following groups of people (and others at my discretion):

  • People who are noisy chewers. Nails on a chalkboard to me, an epidemic of epic proportions. Cover them up – and see how they like to eat under a cover – two birds with one stone!
  • Anyone who refuses to stop talking on the phone while their server is trying to take their order. For you… a tablecloth! Poof! Now you’re gone, hiding under your linen, and your rudeness is contained to your tablecloth bubble.
  • Couples who insist on being SAME SIDE SITTERS. If we’re being honest, this bothers me so much that the next time I see it happen, I may ask my server to escort the lovebirds out of the restaurant. If that doesn’t work, let’s make sure they get two tablecloths so they can snuggle under the covers – which is where they clearly would rather be…amiright?
  • People who step on my yoga mat with their toe-fungus-hot-yoga-feet. You have the entire room to tromp around – get the hell off my mat! Yoga under a blanket for you – AND STAY THERE!
  • Drivers who don’t stop to let pedestrians standing in the crosswalk actually cross the street. Next to the park. With a stroller. In a neighborhood full of kids. Maybe if they had a tablecloth on their car, they’d be forced to hit the brake.
  • People who pee on the toilet seat in a public restroom and then don’t clean it up. You’re not a savage, and at least if you had a tablecloth you could mop up your piss. How did you miss the toilet by that much anyway? If you insist on peeing all over everything, you may as well just drop trou wherever you are and let it flow. Own it, bitches.
  • People who push the door close button on the elevator even though they see others waiting to get on. I do hope your elevator gets stuck and all you have to get through the day is snuggling with your linen.
  • People who make a half-assed attempt to hold the door for you, but then decide they can’t hold the door long enough for you to actually walk through and they let go. It doesn’t count as chivalrious or polite if you can’t hold it for the duration of someone else crossing the threshold – but hey, don’t let the door hit you on the way out when I hand you a freshly pressed napkin!

There’s more, I’m sure. But back to the issue at hand – my story has a happyish ending! Although I couldn’t find our server to say something to him on our way out (weird that he was MIA, right?), I did write the manager a note and included information about Connecticut breastfeeding laws. He apologized and said he would make sure to share during the morning wait staff meetings and at the end of the day, sharing this type of information is a great first step to normalize breastfeeding but we have a long way to go.

#normalizebreastfeeding

#normalizebreastfeeding | photograph by Katie Slater http://www.katieslaterphotography.com

World Breastfeeding Week 2014 – Resources

If no one is doing anything about the same-side sitters plaguing restaurants around the world, then at least let nursing mamas feed their babies free of harassment and discrimination. In honor of World Breastfeeding Week 2014, I wanted to spread some knowledge and resources.

  • Here’s a summary of the Connecticut General Statutes §46a-64 that I sent to the restaurant (excerpt from the Connecticut Breastfeeding Coalition) that protect nursingmamas:
    • BREASTFEEDING IN PLACES OF PUBLIC ACCOMMODATION
      Connecticut General Statutes §46a-64 allows mothers to breastfeed their babies in places of public accommodation. This law is enforced by the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO), which enforces anti-discrimination laws in Connecticut.
    • This law states that mothers can generally breastfeed at a time, place and manner of their choosing while in a place of public accommodation. They do not have to go to a special area or go into the restroom. They do not have to cover the baby with a towel or blanket. The owner, manager or employee of a place of public accommodation cannot request that the mother stop breastfeeding her baby, cover up, move to a different room or area, or leave.
  • Breastfeeding Laws by State. We have a long way to go, but there are laws in place in many states to protect breastfeeding moms in public, at work, and at daycares.
  • Break TIme for Nursing Mothers. This is, for the most part, the bare minimum. Encourage your employer to go above and beyond!
  • Under the ACA, many mamas are eligible for a free breast pump and covered lactation services. FREE!
  • Breastfeeding support and education can drastically change a mother’s experience with nursing. Organizations like La Leche League, Breastfeeding USA, and websites like KellyMom provide FREE mother-to-mother support online, in person, and over the phone. Did I say FREE? Yes, that’s right – there are people who care so much about seeing mothers successfully breastfeed that there are more free and accessible resources than one could fathom.

So aside from supporting nursing mothers (or any mother for that matter!) any time you see them – a kind smile, an offer of help, a glass of water, or simple acknowledgement that they are doing a good job – please take a few minutes to share some of these resources with people in your life – friends, family, colleagues, moms, moms-to-be, and more. Let’s get women out from under the covers and #normalizebreastfeeding. Because seeing a boob is way less offensive than same side sitters – I’ll stand by that forever – and maybe by the time our children are parents, this kind of conversation won’t even be a blip on their radar.

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Working and Pumping with The Lil’ Mamas

I have a long list of things I want to write about here (like awesome recipes, losing baby weight, and surviving the first year of parenthood) and I will post all of that. Soon. I promise. As soon as I remember to take good pictures of meals, write down all the thoughts streaming through my head at any given moment, and take a second to sit down and breathe.

But in the meanwhile… here’s a shameless plug for readers to head on over to The Lil’ Mamas and check out my recent post: ALL  THE SH*T NO ONE EVER TOLD YOU ABOUT… WORKING AND PUMPING.

Because really… WHY DON’T PEOPLE TELL YOU THESE THINGS?

 

 

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The mile high pumping club

I just survived 60 baby-free hours traveling to and from Denver. They were filled with trains, planes, automobiles, uninterrupted meals that I was able to eat with both hands, and the first time I’ve slept through the night in a long while. I missed my family terribly, but I would be lying if I said it wasn’t nice to get a bit of a reprieve from changing diapers, endless laundry, cooking and more. I wasn’t off the hook completely though – as a breastfeeding mom, I still had to pump about 15 oz. of milk each day to maintain my supply.

This meant dragging my breastpump – encased in a stylish shoulder tote – and all of its glorious accessories, chargers, and spare parts with me. That bag has an unspoken power to connect people who know what it is. And now, after many months of pumping, my pump should probably be considered a significant other – we spend a lot of time together, things get pretty intimate, we’re never far apart, and we were finally taking our first plane trip together.

The inspector gadget of pumping bags - you'd never know!

The inspector gadget of pumping bags – you’d never know what’s inside…!

Want to see how it works?

On my way through security in LGA, TSA pulled me aside, inspected my bags, and swabbed the pump for explosives. We began talking about breastpumps, starting with the TSA agent asked me what “it” was. I mean, shouldn’t he have asked “who” it was? (My boyfriend, obviously.) Plus, he just got pretty personal with my pump when he started prodding with the swab. I explained it was a boob-squeezing, milk-sucking, monster of a machine.

“I need you to tell me how it works,” he said. “I’m going to open this bag with you. Would you like to go in private? I know this is a sensitive topic.”

Little did he know that in the recent past I had given birth to an audience in the hospital and along with the baby, pushed out all sense of shame I could ever possibly feel for the rest of my life about natural bodily functions. Private? AS IF.

I then did what any brazen, super-duper-pro-nursing-in-public-mama (who thinks the only way that we will normalize breastfeeding is by talking about it) would do: I offered him a demo with a straight face at 5:30am on a Wednesday. Not surprisingly, he declined. We then talked about how it worked, how I planned to bring my milk back, and he sent me on way to board my flight – another adventure in and of itself.

Joining the mile-high pumping club

Just some of the interesting places I’ve pumped include: a car parked in a pull-off on the West Side Highway, the bathroom of the corner deli somewhere around 49th and 10th, a locker room, and perhaps the most random: in a closet during a climate-change event being held at the Jewish Heritage Museum while listening to the audio of a movie about World War II.

The time had come for us to join the mile high pumping club. I thought about discreetly pumping at my seat, but the bathroom was a better option than sitting through another moment of being subjected the make out sesh going on between my row-mates – I’m surprised they weren’t capitalizing on the unoccupied bathrooms, too. Their loss, because “we” were headed in there to get down to business.

At this point in time I’d need to acknowledge how critical it is to have a battery adapter for a breastpump. Sometimes outlets are nowhere to be found, and if you don’t have the battery pack you better get to squeezin’.  Also, if there is someone out there who can shrink a monster computer into a handheld rechargeable marvel of modern engineering and technology that is also a mobile phone then there has got to be something they can do about THE DUMBEST, MOST ENORMOUS, LOUDEST F&*KING MILK MACHINE CONTRAPTION EVER THAT REQUIRES EIGHT AA BATTERIES TO OPERATE. I repeat: EIGHT AA BATTERIES.

I got set up and things started flowing. My mind was wandering to places like, “I wonder how altitude impacts milk production?” when we hit a pocket of turbulence that almost knocked me off my feet. Becoming a parent has encouraged me to jump to the worst possible scenario so I immediately thought, “I DON’T WANT TO DIE WITH A MEDIEVAL BOOB TORTURE DEVICE ATTACHED TO MY CHEST. I WILL NOT GO DOWN LIKE THIS. THIS IS NOT HOW IT ENDS.”

The plane evened out, I finished up, and asked the flight attendant for a handful of ice. A handful turned into about 2 pounds. Since beggars can’t be choosers, I shoved it all in the cooler, settled in for the rest of the flight and crossed my fingers that the ice didn’t start to melt out of the overhead bin and onto someone’s head. After we landed, I made a pit stop in the airport bathroom to unload some of the ice when a woman spied my pump bag (I TOLD you so) and said she was a lactation consultant. She then went on to say the single nicest thing a complete stranger has ever said to me (yes, even better than that time the creepy pet store guy told me I had “nice thighs”): she told me that she was proud of me and that it made her day to see a nursing, traveling mama with her boyfriend breastpump. Lactation brings people together in some strange ways.

Just for lunch 

48 hours and about 35 oz of milk later, I found myself back at DEN. Despite my best efforts to alert every TSA agent I saw that I was declaring breastmilk, I managed to hold up the line for a good 10 minutes while they found someone “authorized” to test my milk. I offered the agent a swig; he refused. Since my pump was the only one NOT rejecting me, I repeated my “pumping in an airplane bathroom” trick on the way home, again asking for ice from a flight attendant. He dutifully filled up my Ziploc bag and when he saw me putting it in the cooler he said, “Oh, I thought it was for a sprain or something. Turns out it’s just for lunch!”

“You’re right,” I said. “Just not for my lunch.”

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Nursing in public? Don’t mind if I do…

To cover or not?

I was on the plane after spending a few days in Arizona, dreading the return flight to New York. Our trip to Phoenix was one for the record books (read all the gory, puke-covered details here) and while I had done a ton of laundry once I got there, I failed to wash my nursing cover. A beautiful hand-made, hand-dyed nursing cover that I simply didn’t have time to hand-wash (weird, right?…. no time to wash something by hand with a baby around?).

Anyway, the cover reeked like it had been sitting in puke for four days so I didn’t even bother to bring it in my carry-on – I figured I would just use a blanket to cover up and make do. As the baby started getting hungry, I started setting up logistics in my head – I had to juggle a nursing pillow, blanket/cover, baby, and myself in the cramped airplane seat. It was already uncomfortable enough, and with the Arizona heat and poorly circulated airplane air, I was sweating and not looking forward to layering up just to feed the baby.

My thoughts turned to a few days prior at JFK when I saw a woman nursing her baby, sans cover, in the middle of the airport. If I was just a passer-by, I would never have even noticed. But I knew what she was doing, and I knew she was my people – a nursing, traveling mother who just wanted to get to her destination without anyone losing their shit. I thought if she could do it, why couldn’t I?

Want to know why nursing in public is such a big step for moms to take in our fair country? Because people react like total assholes, and the last thing a tired mom wants to do is deal with someone outside of her family giving her a hard time (is it not enough that she deals with pint-sized tyrants at home – must she deal with adult-sized idiots in public?). Look at the search results for “breastfeeding discrimination” or see how many women have “nurse-in protests”  for stupid shit like someone being asked to stop breastfeeding because she was “scaring children.”  These were news stories I never really paid attention to until they pertained to me directly – I began to wonder, as a breastfeeding mother, when I might be impacted by this type of discrimination – not if. It seems inevitable.

My rant beings

For whatever reason, we’ve gotten away from breastfeeding being the norm and it’s seen as the exception to the rule or something people do “in private.” It offends people, it makes people uncomfortable, boobs are “private” parts, the library is no places for nipples… and so on. But really, how could you justify taking offense at a mother feeding her child? It’s like, one of the most harmless, selfless acts EVER to share your nourishment with a baby. Amiright… or amiright? 

How often do people excuse themselves from an activity to go eat “in private”? Do they put blankets over their heads to eat a sandwich simply because it’s lunchtime? No, and no. So why would we expect these beautiful, tiny babies and their lactating mothers (who, quite honestly, have enough to worry about) to hightail it out of the room/restaurant/wherever when hunger strikes or literally take cover? (And before anyone jumps down my throat – I recognize that there are cultural/religious/personal views that require covering up in public. This post isn’t about that.)

I wish I knew what about breastfeeding makes normal people turn into awkward, bumbling fools because their totally unsupportive (and dare I say… selfish?) reactions to maybe seeing a nipple for 3 seconds can send a shy nursing mom into corners, under covers, and into closets. There are so many double standards going on it makes me sick. When someone gets all weird the second they see a mom expose 3 square inches of flesh to feed their baby, I hope they don’t think they’re fooling anyone into thinking they’re modest and really truly offended because in today’s day and age, I seriously doubt that they offered a blanket to cover up the scantily clad woman walking down the street, someone wearing a string bikini at the beach, the man without a shirt on playing basketball at the park, or had a hissy fit when an ad for Victoria’s Secret comes on during the commercial break of their favorite television show.

Guess what people? It’s a boob and there is nothing “scary” going on. It’s nothing sexual, or “adult,” or XXX happening. The 3-second flash of a nipple you might see if you’re looking close enough while baby latches is not going to blind you or cause any lasting damage. In fact, it’s probably going to calm the fussy, hungry baby and allow everyone to get on with whatever they were doing in the first place – shopping, taking public transportation, or enjoying the park.

But if this all isn’t sad enough, it breaks my heart that our society is so ass backward that we had to go and pass laws protecting nursing mothers – stating that they have the right to nurse their child in a place where they have the right to be. While I’m glad the laws are there – because people harass nursing mothers kind of a lot – I can’t help but think it’s pretty pathetic that breastfeeding is such a hot button issue that we spent money passing legislation to protect something that mammals have been doing since the dawn of time. Breastfeeding isn’t new. It’s not deviant. It’s not harmful. In fact, it’s healthy, normal, and natural.

How can we fix this? Do better next time!

OK, I’m done ranting. It’s time to figure out where we go from here. Maybe you’ve been a total ass to someone without even realizing it – whether it be gawking, offering a cover, leaving the room/business, or otherwise being a totally unsupportive human being/family member/friend. Maybe you thought you were making mom more comfortable by offering a cover – or whatever you did – but probably not. It’s time to do better next time.

Try this: act normal. Be yourself. Don’t turn into a bumbling idiot because ohmigod there’s a nip. Smile, make eye contact, continue your conversation, and for pete’s sake… don’t gawk. Bring that mom a glass of water or maybe a little snack because nursing is exhausting, and dehydrating, and literally sucks the nutrition out of her body for another human being (I told you it was selfless). At the same time, it’s also breathtaking, and beautiful, and amazing so let her know that, and let her know what a damn good job she is doing. Take the opportunity to teach your children, your husband, your friends that breastfeeding is how babies eat – just like kittens, puppies, and baby mammals of all kinds  – and there’s really nothing offensive or scary about a lactating human.

Basically, if I had to sum it up in a nutshell, I’d say: OFFER SUPPORT AND DON’T ACT LIKE AN ASSHOLE. It’s that easy, folks.

A Phoenix returns (oh please, I couldn’t help myself)

So I went for it on the plane – coverless. I popped my boob out of my shirt, latched the baby on, and much to my surprise, no one had a hissy fit or called the authorities (but I was ready to go all mama bear on them if I had to). It was pretty much a non-event; I switched sides, put myself back together, and the baby went right to sleep for during the red-eye back to JFK. And you know what? It felt AWESOME. I didn’t have to mess with the cover, neither of us started to overheat, and I didn’t feel like I was very publicly hiding something that I wasn’t ashamed of to begin with. We were both happier, and so were all of our seatmates on the plane. Since that moment, I’ve never looked back and nurse freely all over the place – restaurants, airports, parks, parties, while I’m walking the dog around the neighborhood, wherever. I can only hope that another mom will see me and think, “I can do that too.”

Because she can, and dammit, she should.

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15 Tips by Trimester for First-time Pregnant Moms

The countdown is on – the final days are here! I’ve nested, prepped, packed, organized, re-organized, and been thinking and reflecting a lot. Over the last 40 weeks (and even some time before that) I received a lot of advice about being pregnant – some good, some terrible – but thought I would pay forward some of the most useful tidbits. So, here goes!

15 Tips for first-time pregnant moms

First Trimester

1. Find the right care provider for you.  Just because you’ve been going to the same OB for the last 10 years doesn’t mean they are a good fit for you and your baby. For us, we found great midwives and a hypnobirthing coach. They have made this whole experience 10,000 times better than I ever could have imagined. So, explore your options… and don’t feel guilty about it!

2. Don’t read pregnancy books (or internet discussion boards) that cause you anxiety. Sorry, What to Expect When You’re Expecting, but you are kind of scary. And Google? You are way too quick to lead me to believe that there is something majorly wrong with the little cramp I just felt “down there.” There is such a thing as too much information, and it’s really hard to avoid but… try to stay away. If you really think something is wrong, call your care provider before trying to self-diagnose.

3. Buy a nightlight for your bathroom. During the first and third trimesters I’ve spent more time peeing in the middle of the night than I can count; the overhead light in the bathroom was too jarring and I found it hard enough to navigate my way there without stepping on the dog, any of his toys, or walking into the wall half asleep. That little beacon of light coming from the bathroom has saved me many times… best five dollars I’ve spent!

4. Go easy on the maternity clothes. I mean, maternity pants are kind of amazing and I never want to wear anything with a normal waistband again but… save some money this trimester. Pick up very few essentials that you really need (for me, it was a pair of black maternity slacks and a new bra) and wear the hell out of them until you have a better idea of how your body is changing as you go.

5. Find your support system. Find family, friends, a new mom group, La Leche League, whatever works for you! Make a point to stay engaged, ask questions, and meet new moms. Having the support as you go through pregnancy and beyond is invaluable. As one of the midwives at the birthing center said, “When you grow babies together, you form lifelong friendships.” Truth!

Second Trimester

6. Go away – no, really! Whatever it is that will help you relax – time away with your partner, your friends, or just you… make a point to get away and enjoy it.

7. Cross major items off your to-do list. Get the nursery set, finish projects around the house, and tie up loose ends before third trimester exhaustion creeps up.

8. Take a childbirth class and learn about your rights as a patient and parent. The more you know, the better off you and your baby are during birthing and beyond. Decide what type of birth experience you want to have, learn everything you can about the procedures in place where you’re birthing (from what you can do during labor, what tools do they have available to help you, to what their procedures are for the baby after birth including tests, vaccines, etc.) and then decide if it’s a good fit for your family.

9. Sleep a lot (and write down your crazy dreams). Sleeping was one of my favorite parts of the second trimester – for me, I was still sleeping comfortably and wasn’t peeing as often as I was during the first or third trimester. And those crazy pregnancy dreams? Write them down and share them with people (if they aren’t too weird) because they are hilarious.

10. Back to those maternity clothes. It’s probably time to expand your wardrobe – see what you can borrow from friends or find second-hand; save your money to buy a really cute outfit for your shower or maternity photo shoot if you’re doing one. Other than the hand-me-downs I received, my go-to shopping spots for a few necessities (which I’ve worn to death) included the clearance racks at Macy’s, Target, and Kohl’s.

Third trimester:

11. Everything is harder on your body so celebrate the small victories – and ask for help. Honestly, I didn’t even feel that pregnant (other than my bout with morning sickness) until I hit the third trimester. All of a sudden everything was harder and I needed help with things… I hate asking for help. My low point came at the end of a long day at work when I found that I could not comfortably reach down to unclasp my sandals; I decided my small victory for the day was getting them on in the first place, and then sucked it up and asked my husband to reverse-Cinderella the shoes off my feet. 

12. Savor the time your baby is in your belly… it’s almost over! I have felt nothing but amazement every time I feel the baby move (OK, and a little bit of discomfort during those kicks and punches to the cervix) or wake up and see that my belly has grown. It’s just SO cool! As excited as I am to meet the little guy or girl, I’m a bit sad that pregnancy is almost over. Baby is safe and always with you when they’re in your belly. It’s a special time – so take every opportunity you can to soak it in.

13. Put a waterproof pad underneath your fitted sheet. Your body will continue to do things that are out of your control, and you will appreciate the waterproof pad saving your bedding if your boobs leak/you pee yourself/your water breaks at night/etc. at any given point in time from here on out. After baby comes, use it for any and all of the inevitable messes you’ll be dealing with. 

14. Stock up! It’s helped me mentally prepare for a big change knowing that I have easy-to-eat-with-one-hand meals in the freezer, ready to go, and that I’ve stocked the house with necessities and recommendations from friends like:

  • Post-birth goodies: chux pads, maxi pads (yes, like the ones you used in middle school), mesh underwear (the least sexy underwear you’ll ever put on, or so I hear), Preparation-H wipes (in case that happens, again)
  • Baby essentials: diapers, wipes, shampoo, gentle laundry detergent, clothes
  • Kitchen goods: paper towels, dish soap, napkins, dried & canned goods
  • Bathroom supplies: toilet paper, shampoo, soap
  • Other important stuff: bottles of wine, cheese, updated netflix queue for middle-of-the-night feedings

15. Make a wishlist – plenty of people (family and friends, near and far) will ask what they can help with. Be ready with an answer (or two). Don’t be afraid to take someone up on their offer of walking the dog, throwing in a load of laundry, or even picking up a few things for you at the store. People want to help, but sometimes don’t know what to do so… help them help you and be ready with that wishlist!

If nothing else… enjoy every minute of your pregnancy – the easy days and the hard ones. This is just the beginning of a fantastic journey so keep a journal, take pictures, and savor it.

What did I miss? I know there’s more great advice out there from moms and mom-to-bes! Leave your advice in the comments!

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