Tag Archives: clean eating

Quinoa Salad

It’s the end of July – when did that happen?! I love summer – aside from the great weather, there is always something going on. Lately it’s been weddings, but when we’re not celebrating nuptials with our friends, there are boat rides, beach trips, and barbeques to keep us occupied. Therein lies the rub: with so many things going on, it can be hard to find time to reset. We pretty much put aside most projects at the house, and I also find that I cook a lot less. It makes me sad that I’m less adventurous in the kitchen during the warmer months, but it also forces me to find easy and light dishes that will keep me going through the summer madness.

After pinning about 3,000,000 recipes for a quinoa salad on Pinterest, I ended up making one up using the fresh vegetables I picked up at the market and what I had in the pantry. You could put most vegetables in here and it would be good, no matter what. I threw together a lime-cumin dressing, similar to the one I made for the corn and black bean salad, and it was all pretty painless.

Quinoa salad with summery vegetables

Ingredients

Salad

  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 1 yellow pepper, chopped
  • 1 orange pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 cup red onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 cup of quinoa, cooked

Dressing

  • 1 tbsp. of olive oil
  • 3 tbsp. of lime juice
  • 1 tsp. of cumin
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Combine chopped vegetables, cilantro, and quinoa in a large bowl. Mix well.
  2. Combine dressing ingredients in a small bowl. Mix well, using salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Pour dressing over salad, mix well, and serve.

If serving this as a side, it makes quite a bit – the leftovers stayed really well in the fridge. Happy summer!

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Chicken and Lemon Summer Salad

If you are looking for the perfect summer salad, look no further. This tasty Chicken and Lemon Summer Salad is a gem – it’s crisp and refreshing, great to bring to a BBQ, and won’t leave you with the remorse of having indulged in one too many hot dogs.

Preparing this dish is a lot of fun – the zesty yellow lemons, bright and cheerful peppers, and aromatic cilantro all scream summer. Not to mention, all those fresh ingredients make the kitchen smell great without having to even turn on the stove!

I found the original recipe in a cookbook I picked up called Cooking Light Chicken Tonight! and I didn’t change much except added more cilantro (seriously, I’m obsessed) and included orange peppers to the vegetable mix. Helpful hint: to yield more juice from the lemons, microwave them for 30 seconds before juicing.

Chicken and Lemon Salad

Ingredients

Chicken:

  • 3/4 cup fresh lemon juice (about 4 lemons)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 (6-ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • Cooking spray

Salad:

  • 1 cup sugar snap peas, trimmed
  • 1/2 cup each: red, yellow, orange bell pepper strips
  • 1 cup (1/4-inch-thick) slices zucchini
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. To prepare chicken, combine the first 4 ingredients in a large zip-top plastic bag. Add chicken to bag, and seal. Marinate in the refrigerator 1 hour, turning occasionally.
  2. Prepare grill.
  3. Remove chicken from bag; discard marinade. Place chicken on a grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 6 minutes on each side or until done. Cool completely; cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices.
  4. To prepare salad, cook peas in boiling water 30 seconds. Drain, and rinse with cold water. Drain. Combine peas and all remaining ingredients in a large bowl; add chicken, tossing to combine.
  5. Place 1 3/4 cups chicken salad on each of 4 plates. Serve with lemon wedges, if desired.
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Better Balanced Diet – Kicking the Diet Soda Habit

I’ve been hard at work over the last year and a half kicking bad eating habits out of my life. I’m proud of how far I’ve come – aside from cutting out a lot of junk and nutrition-less foods, I’ve even managed to curb my sweet tooth and now only have a couple small pieces of chocolate a day (as opposed to bingeing on sweets because I felt like it). But, one bad habit has been hanging around that I haven’t been able to completely kick: diet soda.

I’ve gone through phases with soda where I won’t drink much of it, and think I’m close to quitting, but then get pulled back in because diet soda just “goes” so well with a particular meal. It also “goes” against all the other healthy habits I strive for in my life: to eat natural, whole foods that have nutritional benefits and not to eat “just because.” I’m at the point where even the dog is eating a wholesome diet complete with natural dog food and raw veggies!

So, I did something today that I have been avoiding at all costs: I looked up and really gave some thought to the ingredients in diet soda. After reading for about 20 seconds, I got up, dumped the diet soda I was drinking down the drain, and vowed to quit cold turkey. I didn’t learn anything new, per se, but I did approach the information I was reading from a new perspective of wanting to kick this habit. As silly as it sounds, I thought to myself, “I would never in a million years let the dog drink diet soda, so why am I allowing myself to?” (I say this with some hesitation, because Cooper also eats a lot of things that I never would like sticks, bones, and the green fuzzy stuff on tennis balls… but you know what I mean.)  

Now that I’m ready to admit that I’ve been in denial about how worthless diet soda is,  I thought I would share some of the things that truly did scare me straight. This is only the tip of the iceberg, there is a lot of information out there (and much of it is sensational, to be honest, so read with a keen eye to the source!) but I thought these tid-bits were helpful:

  • “Caramel coloring” is tricky marketing wordplay
  • Aspartame is so far from acceptable in a clean diet
  • Potassium benzoate is used in FIREWORKS
  • The acidic nature of soda can ruin your teeth

I tried to pinpoint when exactly I became “hooked,” because soda wasn’t something I grew up drinking. It was an occasional treat. It wasn’t until college that I began to drink diet soda regularly – aside from an endless supply available on campus (and at all-you-can-eat dining halls where there were also piles of unhealthy food choices), I thought I would be doing myself a favor in saving some calories in the mixed drink department when we went to parties if I used diet instead of regular. Soon it crept into my every day life, and I began thinking that while some people drank coffee for a caffeine jolt, I preferred diet soda. It was my version of “coffee.”

Well, coffee substitute no longer – I’m making a conscious decision to cut it out of my diet once and for all. Wish me luck!

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Chicken Rolls with Asparagus and Mozzarella

The other day I walked into Fairway and right in front of me were these petite asparagus spears – they looked perfect for the chicken rolls that were dancing around in my head and with that, an impromptu recipe was born.  After picking up some thin chicken cutlets, I was ready to cook – I had everything else at home, making this an easy weeknight recipe that takes little thought, effort, or preparation.

CHICKEN ROLLS WITH ASPARAGUS AND MOZZARELLA

Ingredients

  • 4 chicken cutlets, pounded thin and evenly
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • non-stick cooking spray
  • salt and pepper, for seasoning meat
  • whole wheat bread crumbs

    Chicken rolls w/ asparagus and mozzarella!

Directions

  1. Sautee asparagus in olive oil until bright green. Set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  3. Spray a baking dish with non-stick cooking spray.
  4. Pat chicken dry and lightly season with salt and pepper.
  5. Lay out chicken breast, arrange asparagus on top, and sprinkle with mozzarella.
  6. Roll chicken around asparagus and cheese; place seam down in baking dish.
  7. Repeat with remaining chicken breasts.
  8. Sprinkle whole wheat bread crumbs on top of chicken.
  9. Cook for approximately 25-30 mins* or until chicken registers 160/165 degrees with a meat thermometer.

That’s it – veggies plus protein in one fell swoop and a nice way to switch up chicken and vegetables! I suggest serving this with brown rice or cous-cous as a side to round out a nicely balanced meal that makes for a yummy, crowd-pleasing dinner and great leftovers.

This is also a solid base recipe – you could switch out asparagus for mushrooms or another veggie, use a different type of cheese, or even make mini flank steak roll-ups using the same concepts. Happy eating!

*October 31, 2012 update: It might take a little longer than 10 minutes to cook your chicken depending on the strength of your oven, size of cutlets, etc. Never consume raw or undercooked meat – always rely on a good meat thermometer to let you know when food is done!

*November 11, 2013 update: OK, OK, I have heard you all loud and clear – I changed the cooking time from 10 mins – I must have a magical oven or be totally inept at keeping time. Originally, I only cooked these for about 10 mins but the cutlets I used were really, really, really thin. So don’t eat raw meat, cook it long enough, and plan ahead accordingly.

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You are so totally what you eat

A recent RADIOLAB podcast called GUTS really got me thinking about food (as if I didn’t think about food enough already throughout the day…) but it helped me get beyond meal planning and really dig into what happens when you eat. I’m not a biology whiz, but I understand on very basic levels how the human body processes food. I know the types of foods I should embrace to reach my fitness goals, and the types of foods I should avoid. But, that’s about it. This podcast helped me take things to a higher level.

First, the RADIOLAB folks explored what goes on when your stomach digests food. Digestion is pretty basic, right? Your stomach uses what it needs from the food you eat and sends it around to different parts of the body – maybe muscles need to recover, bones need to mend, etc. But, the podcast got me thinking that in a very strange way that any given meal essentially morphs into the being who ate it. It becomes an inseparable part of the body – fueling cells and bodily functions – rather than just being the input and output of a system. This gives a new perspective on the old adage that you are what you eat.

Perhaps the most interesting terrifying part of the podcast was when a researcher, John Cryan, spoke about the thousands of species of bacteria that are alive and well in your body. You’re never alone. There is a whole world of little creatures hanging out in your gut at any given moment, and you better hope they are in balance otherwise you might experience the stomach virus from hell. But, I digress…

Cryan also spoke about some interesting experiments on mice that look at how the presence of different types of lactobacillus bacteria (same stuff in yogurt, cheese, and more) in their guts impacted their personalities and how they react to stress. Turns out, the mice have a direct link – the largest nerve in their body – between the stomach and brain. When the nerve is intact, and the lactobacillus is present, it seems that a message goes from the gut to the brain for the mice to remain calm. Sever that nerve, and the mice react with panic. Then, Jonah Lehrer, a frequent RADIOLAB contributor, came on to say that a similar experiment was done with humans: participants who ingested high levels of probiotics exhibited biological reactions similar to taking anti-anxiety meds. 

From my (non-scientific) everyday observations, it’s pretty clear to me that when I eat well, I feel good. When I don’t, not only does my body feel terrible, but I also feel an emotional impact as well. I’m sure part of it is psychological – that immediate guilt of eating something unhealthy, how it wouldn’t be so hard to have eaten a piece of fruit instead of a cookie – but it makes sense that biological reactions to the ingredients in food could compound these emotions. That’s even more reason for me to steer clear of the bad stuff – and I certainly don’t want to upset the crazy microorganisms that keep my body in balance.

There is no way that this summary has done the podcast justice so click here to listen to the GUTS episode and let me know what you think!

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Lessons I’ve Learned from Training the Dog (so far)

It was only hours after we returned from our honeymoon that Cooper officially moved in with us – and it was quickly apparent that the honeymoon was over and we had a major new responsibility at home. Despite being a self-proclaimed “cat person,” I was feeling optimistic about training Cooper – I did, after all, read Dog Training for Dummies on the plane ride to and from St. Kitt’s. How hard could it be if there was a Dummies book about it?

Turns out, it was harder than I thought. About a week into “home schooling” Cooper, I put the book away and decided we needed help. Professional help. We signed up for a weekly training class with Ken Berenson who runs sessions at the Round Hill Community Center in Greenwich for both beginner and novice level dogs. On the first night of school, Ken used his miniature poodle named Bear to demonstrate what we’d be learning during our time in what I took to calling “first grade.” My jaw dropped to the ground as Bear listened and responded to everything Ken said – he stopped on a dime, he sat, he stood, he ran, he retrieved – it was magical. At the same time, I was practically sitting on top of Cooper, a gangly mess of legs, fur, and paws, to keep him in one place. Bear was prim, proper, and well-behaved. In other words, the complete opposite of Cooper. (I suppose that only helped to illustrate Ken’s points about the value of a well-trained dog.)

Over the next few weeks, I was pleasantly surprised that Cooper started to show improvement. On the last night of first grade, we walked in for the test. This was it – Cooper either graduated and moved on to 2nd grade, or he was held back. Not wanting to have spent the last six weeks of training in vain, I tried to reason with Coop and explained that failing was simply not an option. He must have understood me, because we moved through each section of the test rather successfully. I insisted that Cooper give me a high-five, one of his favorite only “tricks,” after he received each passing mark. Ken handed us Cooper’s certificate and I did what any proud dog parent would do: I mailed away to the American Kennel Club for Cooper’s “Puppy Good Citizen” medal. It was $10 well spent on the medal because I honestly believe Cooper enjoys wearing it:

It was a proud day for us.

To date we’re about halfway through the 2nd grade with Cooper, and while he’s still a little pretty crazy, he is a better listener and I no longer have to sit on him to get him to stay still.

All this time that we’ve spent training Cooper got me to thinking that we’re on parallel tracks, really. Cooper’s training wouldn’t be going well if we didn’t put in the effort – which is how I feel about the time I spend at the gym. The more disciplined and committed you are to training, whether at the gym or puppy school, the better the results. It’s helped me realize a few things like:

1. There will be good days, and there will be bad days.

Right after I took the picture of Cooper wearing his medal, we went to our regularly scheduled training class and Cooper was the “bad puppy” in school. I felt like he wasn’t listening and by the time we left, I was mentally and physically exhausted. I had to wonder – did the photo shoot with his new medal go right to his head? Did he think just because he got to wear it, that he could stop paying attention to me? But, after all, I have bad days, too.  Whether I’m preoccupied or just not giving it 110%, not every workout is fantastic. So I cut him some slack – we embraced the bad training session and moved on.

2. There will come a distraction that is too tempting to resist – but there are always consequences.

We installed an electric fence around the property, and Cooper quickly learned about what happens when he gets too close to it. Even knowing this, every once in a while the temptation on the other side is too strong and he hears a fateful warning beep before a little zap. That’s how I feel when I fall off the clean eating wagon. I am completely aware of what I’m doing and I know I’m going to feel bad about it later, but in the moment those [chocolatey deserts/greasy buffalo wings/cheesy nachos] look way too good to pass up. Luckily, those moments are less frequent for both of us. I am learning to train myself to think beyond the immediate satisfaction and have my own warning beep – instead of focusing on how good something tastes in the moment, I think ahead to how I’m going to feel afterwards, both mentally and physically, and it’s easier to say no. 

3. Rewards go a long way.

Cooper cooperates better when there is a reward at stake – usually it’s a tasty treat or his favorite toy. Rewards seem to work the same way for me, but I tend to reward myself with new Lululemon gear rather than food. The more I work out, the better reason I have to replace my sneakers, buy new (smaller!) workout pants or get a fun new workout top.

4. Proper equipment (and form) makes a big difference.

One of my favorite games to play with the Coop is a simple game of chase – I take off running and he chases me. If I get far enough ahead of him, I hide and wait for him to find me. Then we do it all over again.

We were playing the other night and while he was hot on my tail, I took off running, went to make a hard right up the stairs, and completely wiped out on the hardwood floor… because I was wearing socks. I collapsed into a heap, simultaneously crying and laughing, and Cooper came over and started piling his toys on top of me. It was a painful, yet hilarious, reminder not only is playing chase with a 70 pound dog inside the house a terrible idea, but I really should have been wearing sneakers.

To boot, it was bad form of me to try to outrun the dog who has more legs and a lower center of gravity. But, it’s a good reminder to always use good form and the proper equipment, especially at the gym.

5. It’s OK to rest.

Working like a dog.

Everyone needs a little break at some point – and all too often, I find myself pushing through a busy schedule to tick off to-do list items, stay up late to get things done, or cramming way too much into one day. Sometimes the best thing to do is take the lead from Cooper: kick back and take a nap!

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Power-Up Whole Wheat Lasagna Roll-Ups

I’m always on the search for an easy healthy lasagna recipes (like the no pasta zucchini lasagna!) but today I bring you, by popular demand, power-up whole wheat lasagna roll-ups!  This recipe is easy enough for a weeknight meal, hearty enough to freeze for leftovers, and just plan delicious. For a vegetarian option, simply don’t include the ground chicken.

Power-Up Whole Wheat Lasagna Roll-Ups
 

All rolled up, although a little smushed.

 
Ingredients
  • 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tbsp. dried thyme
  • 1 28-oz. can whole tomatoes, with juice
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 lb ground chicken (optional)
  • 1 box frozen spinach, thawed
  • 24-oz. low-fat, low-sodium cottage cheese
  • 1 cup shredded reduced-fat mozzarella cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 8 sheets dried whole-wheat lasagna noodles 

Instructions

  1. Sautee diced onions on medium heat with 1 tsp olive oil. Add garlic in next.
  2. Add ground chicken and cook until no longer pink.
  3. Add tomatoes with juice, salt, and thyme. Reduce heat to medium low, and let simmer for 20 min. Stir occasionally to break the tomatoes into pieces.
  4. While the sauce is simmering, bring a large pot of water to boil. Cook pasta according to box directions. Drain, rinse, and cool in colander.
  5. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  6. Squeeze all remaining moisture from thawed spinach and place in a large bowl. Add cottage cheese, egg, and 1/4 cup mozzarella cheese; stir until combined.
  7. Spread 1 cup of cooked tomato sauce into bottom of a 9″ x 10″ casserole dish.
  8. Place a cooked lasagna noodle in front of you, spread 1/8 of the cottage cheese mixture across the noodle, and roll it up (see photo below).
  9. Place rolled pasta, seam side down, into the casserole dish
  10. Repeat with remaining noodles, then top with remaining mozzarella cheese.
  11. Bake, covered with foil, for 20 minutes.
  12. Remove foil and broil for 5 minutes or until roll-ups are brown and bubbly.

Whole wheat roll-ups in various stages of undress.

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Clean Breaded Chicken Cutlets

My dear friend Christina and I call one another Chicken, in only the most endearing way, because we heard the following conversation nearly a decade ago and thought it was hilarious:
Little boy: “You’re a chicken!”
Little girl: “Well, You’re a turkey!”
Little boy: “No, you’re a flamingo!”
Ever since then, we have both been known as “Chicken” (and it’s not very original given that we stole the joke from two little kids). I should also mention that our maturity levels drop drastically as soon as the other is in view… and this makes everything we do way more fun while annoying the crap out of everyone around us. More often than not we are the only two people laughing in a movie theater or being asked to stop dressing up in aprons and taking pictures of one another at Anthropologie. Just yesterday we were throwing around poultry-inspired names for a fictional business venture like Chicka Chicka Bawk Bawk and Chicken Coop. We have no ideas or business plans for either, except that the later would probably involve none other than Cooper (the dog). To make a long story short, we now have yet another joke that’s probably only funny to us.
 
So, to honor this long-standing and special friendship, I wanted to share my favorite way to cook chicken (the meat, not the person). Instead of frying the cutlets in oil, they are breaded with clean ingredients and baked. Enjoy!
 
Clean Breaded Chicken Cutlets
 
Ingredients
  • 4-5 chicken cutlets, about 1/4″ thick
  • 1 cup almond meal (sub out whole wheat flour if you are allergic to nuts!)
  • 1/2 cup liquid egg whites
  • 1 cup whole wheat bread crumbs
  • cooking spray

    Clean breaded chicken w/ veggies

 
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Cover baking sheet with aluminum foil and spray with cooking spray.
  3. One by one, coat cutlets in almond meal, egg whites, and bread crumbs.
  4. Arrange in one layer on baking sheet.
  5. Bake for 9-10 minutes, or until juices run clear and chicken is no longer pink in the middle.
  6. Sometimes I serve the chicken plain, but I also have some variations that I use to keep things interesting: I top it with hot sauce and crumbled blue cheese; incorporate it into pasta dishes in lieu of fried cutlets; put it in a whole wheat wrap with tomato, basil & mozzarella – the possibilities are endless!
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Clean Eating Baked Ravioli

I always look forward to finding the latest issue of Clean Eating magazine in the mailbox, and March 2012’s issue did not disappoint! I was immediately drawn to Julie O’Hara’s “Classics, Only Cleaner” column featuring her “not-so” fried ravioli. Any cleaned-up bar food favorite is sure to be a hit with me and I couldn’t wait to try this one out. 

I picked up the ravioli at Fairway and made these on a Friday after work. They only took about half an hour to make, from start to finish, which makes this recipe even more delightful. The final result was a deliciously cheesy, crispy bite-sized appetizer that hit the spot at a fraction of the calories of its fried counterpart. They could even be a stand-in for mozzarella sticks when the craving strikes!

I’ve included the recipe for the ravioli from the magazine below (but I ended up using pre-made marinara sauce to save some time and keep things simple). Enjoy!

Clean baked ravioli

Ingredients

  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 2 egg whites
  • ¼ tsp seal salt, divided
  • 1/8 tsp. plus ¼ tsp. fresh ground black pepper, divided
  • ½ cup fine whole-wheat bread crumbs*
  • ¼ cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (1 oz)
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • Dash ground cayenne pepper, or to taste
  • 1 9-oz package bite-sized whole wheat cheese ravioli
  • Marinara sauce

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Coat a large rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. In a shallow bowl, combine egg whites and 1/8 tsp. each salt and 1/8 tsp. black pepper.
  3. In a separate shallow bowl, combine bread crumbs, remaining 1/8 tsp. salt and ¼ tsp. black pepper, Parmigiano-Reggiano, 1 tsp. dried oregano, 1 tsp. thyme and cayenne.
  4. Dip ravioli into egg mixture and then bread mixture, shaking off excess.
  5. Transfer to baking sheet.
  6. Repeat with remaining ravioli, adding to sheet in a single layer.
  7. Bake, turning once, until lightly browned (or 12-16 minutes).
  8. Serve with marinara sauce.

*Fine whole-wheat bread crumbs do work best, but I didn’t have any so I took regular whole-wheat bread crumbs and ground them a bit with the pestle & mortar.

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Flank Steak Roll

Here’s a quick post to share this flank steak roll recipe from Clean Eating. I haven’t had the best track record cooking steak (read: I’ve wasted lots of time and money ruining beautiful cuts of beef), but I decided to give it another try and was pleasantly surprised with the outcome.

The steak was juicy, the bread crumb mixture was delicious, and it even looked fancy enough for a dinner party. Add a side of couscous and mixed vegetables and you have a rock solid dinner. The instructions for creating the roll look a little complicated but don’t let them turn you away from making it – if I can do it, anyone can! 

Flank steak roll, fresh out of the oven!

Flank Steak Roll with Spinach, Garlic and Toasted Pine Nuts

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 1/4 cup whole-wheat panko
  • 1 tbsp. pine nuts, toasted (see below for instructions)
  • 2 tsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 tsp. fine sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. dried red pepper flakes
  • 1 flank steak (1 lb.), trimmed of visible fat
  • 3 oz. spinach leaves (about 6 cups)
  • Kitchen string
  • Parchment paper

Instructions for Toasted Pine Nuts:

  1. Preheat oven to 300°F.
  2. Place parchment paper on baking sheet.
  3. Arrange pine nuts in one layer.
  4. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until slightly browned.

Instructions for Flank Steak:

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Arrange a rack in a baking pan and coat with cooking spray.
  2. In a small bowl, combine panko, nuts, vinegar, garlic, salt and pepper flakes. Set aside.
  3. Place steak on a work surface. Cut the steak in half horizontally, so that it opens like a book. Spread steak open so that the “spine of the book” is parallel to you.
  4. Spread bread crumb mixture evenly over steak, leaving a 1-inch border along the farthest edge.
  5. Arrange spinach on top of bread crumb mixture.
  6. Beginning with the closest edge, roll steak up, gently pressing down on spinach.
  7. Rotate steak roll so it’s vertical to you and tie crosswise at 1-inch intervals with kitchen string.
  8. Place steak on rack in prepared baking pan and bake until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of steak registers 150°F for medium doneness (about 55 minutes for our oven) or 130°F for medium rare (about 45 minutes for our oven).
  9. Transfer steak roll to a cutting board, loosely cover with foil and let rest for 10 minutes (internal temperature will continue to rise to about 160°F for medium and 140°F for medium rare).
  10. Remove foil and string and carefully cut steak crosswise into 1/2-inch slices.

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